Smelly Old Engines

Below you can see a selection of my engineering work, the Stirling Engine is the latest I am working on.

Philips Cryogenic Stirling Cycle Machine.

From popularity in some niche markets during the 19th century Stirling cycle engines lost out in the rise of the internal combustion engine during the early 20th. In the late 1930's, Philips (Netherlands) were on the lookout for a small, quiet, economical generator to run vacuum tube radios at off-grid locations. More...

Heinrici 2.5" Stirling Engine

Probably manufactured between 1900 and 1910, it is said to have originally run a jewelers lathe or a dentists drill at Kumara. More...

Cambell Engine 1902.

Sure, it did run (for the first time in 78 years) on Saturday and Sunday at our Crank-Up (now renamed the Banging Away weekend), but not, what I would consider, happily.- even after allowing for its Sunday problem being an empty fuel tank (I blame Ray Woollet for this, he should have noticed). More...

1886 Benz.

A replica of the first ever Automobile as built by Carl Benz of Manheim Germany, an engineer/inventor working in the new field of internal combustion engines. More...

De Dion's Le Mono

De Dion-Bouton made their first internal combustion engine'd car in 1898 following the huge success of their motorised tricycle of 1895 and motorcycle of 1898. They quickly became the world's dominant motor vehicle manufacturer and held this position until Henry Ford came out with the Model T in 1909. More...

De Dion-Bouton.

In 1884, De Rochas's prior publication came to light and in anticipation of Otto's patent being invalidated (which occurred in 1886), many designers took up the development challenge. More...

Piwakawaka_Project

The first prototype engine, completed last December, (image left) has now run for more than a hundred hours and goes really well. One of its possible applications is to generate a KW or so of electricity using anything that will burn: wood, agricultural waste, dead books even. More...

Stirling verses Kite.

Robert Stirling did another thing well- he chose his parents carefully- with the consequence that he lived to a ripe old age and eventually attained the official title; "Father of the Church of Scotland". More...

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